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Cohort Two Feasibility Studies

Highlights of Pay for Success (PFS) Feasibility Studies from ICS’ Second Social Innovation Fund Cohort

Released on May 9, 2017

In Cohort Two, ICS worked with four jurisdictions:
Orange County, California
Tennessee
Evansville, Indiana
Tempe, Arizona

Orange County, CA – PFS is feasible to seek improved outcomes through expanded child welfare program

With coaching from ICS, the Children and Families Commission of Orange County explored the feasibility of expanding evidence-based child maltreatment prevention services that are a part of its Neighborhood Resource Network via PFS. This study focused on expanding two programs: Triple P (Positive Parenting Program) and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). The study concluded that PFS financing is a feasible way to reduce child maltreatment in Orange County through an expansion of Triple P. PCIT has also shown significant outcomes and a feasible expansion plan, and would be a strong complementary service to Triple P. With more work into establishing baselines and projecting impacts on child maltreatment, PCIT could also feasibly be expanded through PFS financing. A PFS project could feasibly serve almost 26,000 additional families with Triple P and 1,250 more families through PCIT over five years by expanding in six high-need cities across the County.

Click here for the Executive Summary of the study, as well as a deck presenting key findings.  Please note these are just highlights and not the sum total of the study.

 

Tennessee – PFS is feasible to seek improved outcomes through expanded home visiting

In partnership with the Tennessee Department of Health and with coaching from ICS, the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth conducted a feasibility study focused on the possibility of tapping PFS to expand three evidence-based home visiting programs – Parents as Teachers (PAT), Healthy Families America (HFA), and Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) – to families in need.  The study concluded that Tennessee could feasibly expand home visiting using PFS financing to improve outcomes for low-income mothers and their children. HFA produces at least two PFS-suitable outcomes and could expand in the state via PFS once the program launches a new data system and builds the capacity of local service providers to manage to outcomes. PAT demonstrated strong intermediate outcomes and, with additional data on longer-term “impact outcomes” that can be measured in Tennessee, could consider expansion using PFS in the future. The strongest of the candidates we considered for a PFS project in this context, however, was NFP, which produces at least three outcomes in Tennessee that meet ICS criteria for PFS financing; for example, research indicates that the benefits of investing in NFP significantly exceed the costs. If an outcome payor is secured, Tennessee could use PFS financing to fund the five-year expansion of NFP that would serve nearly 6,000 additional families over five years across six high-need counties, including Shelby County where Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital currently implements the program.

Click here for the Executive Summary of the study, as well as a deck presenting key findings.  Please note these are just highlights and not the sum total of the study.

 

Evansville, IN – PFS is not yet feasible to seek improved outcomes through expanded high-quality pre-K

Through a consulting model, ICS helped the City of Evansville explore if it could feasibly tap PFS to expand high-quality pre-K through the existing On My Way Pre-K (OMW) program for more than 500 additional four-year-olds from low-income families. The study concluded that while PFS financing is not immediately feasible in Evansville due to the need for more rigorous data collection and evaluation, Evansville does have high-quality pre-K programs that it could feasibly expand to improve outcomes for children from low-income families. The benefits of investing in high-quality pre-K significantly exceed the costs, and PFS financing could be viable in two to four years if the City fully implemented appropriate measurement tools and collected data to establish baselines and project impact on outcomes that would be part of a PFS contract.  To this end, we worked with Evansville to create two scaled-down alternative expansion scenarios.  In the first scenario, the state covers additional slots and secures funding for a kindergarten readiness pilot in both new and existing slots, serving 335 additional four-year olds over two years.  In the second scenario, the state does not provide funding, and the kindergarten readiness pilot occurs only in existing slots, serving 209 four-year olds over two years.

Click here for the Executive Summary of the study, as well as a deck presenting key findings.  Please note these are just highlights and not the sum total of the study.

Since the study’s conclusion, the state of Indiana has called for the direct expansion of pre-K in some parts of the state. The effect of the new pre-K law in Evansville will possibly mean Evansville can serve approximately the same number of children in pre-K with direct state funding, rendering the second alternate expansion scenario more relevant.

 

Tempe, AZ – PFS is not yet feasible to seek improved outcomes through expanded high-quality preschool

With coaching from ICS, the City of Tempe focused on the possibility of a PFS project that expands high-quality preschool to be delivered through a partnership with the Tempe Elementary School District T.O.T.S. preschool program, the Kid Zone preschool program, and Quality First, which is the statewide Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS). An expansion in Tempe is not currently feasible using PFS due to the thin research base for Quality First and the inability to quantify the impact of expansion on Teaching Strategies (TS) GOLD, Quality First’s assessment tool. However, the study also concluded that Tempe currently has high-quality preschool programs to serve three- and four-year-old children and the need for additional slots is deep. By partnering with existing providers to increase capacity, Tempe could feasibly expand to improve outcomes for more children from low-income families. Benefits of investing in high-quality preschool exceed the costs, and a PFS expansion could be viable in two to three years if Tempe fully implemented appropriate measurement tools and collected data to establish baselines and project impact on outcomes that would be part of a PFS contract.

As a result of this feasibility study, the Tempe City Council voted in March 2017 to directly fund an expansion of high-quality preschool, offering $3 million more for 20 additional classrooms.

Click here for the Executive Summary of the study, as well as a deck presenting key findings.  Please note these are just highlights and not the sum total of the study.


Requests for access to any other parts of the full feasibility studies are considered on a case by case basis in consultation with each jurisdiction.  Please submit any requests to pfs@instituteforchildsuccess.org. 

ICS is proud to be a SIF grantee and subgrantee

This material is based upon work supported by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) under Social Innovation Fund Grant No. 14PSHSC001. Opinions or points of view expressed in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official position of, or a position that is endorsed by, CNCS. Learn more about ICS’s SIF-funded work here.

The Social Innovation Fund is a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service, a federal agency that engages millions of Americans in service through its AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, Social Innovation Fund (SIF), and Volunteer Generation Fund programs, and leads the President’s national call to service initiative, United We Serve. For more information, visit NationalService.gov.